A Novel Box for Aerosol and Droplet Guarding and Evacuation in Respiratory Infection (BADGER) for COVID-19 and Future Outbreaks

Hau Le, Gordon Novak, Kevin Janek, Jesse Wang, Khang Hyunh, Chris Meyer, Adam Weinstein, Erick Oberstar, Jim Rasmussen, Timothy Bertram

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Received date: 9th May 2020

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) has infected millions and killed hundreds of thousands of people worldwide as of May 2020. Healthcare providers are at increased risks of infection when caring for patients with COVID-19. The mechanism of transmission of SARS-CoV-2 is still not fully understood. However, there is growing evidence for airborne spread, in addition to direct droplet and indirect contact. Here, we report on the design, construction, and testing of the BADGER (Box for Aerosol and Droplet Guarding and Evacuation in Respiratory Infection), an affordable, scalable device that contains droplets and aerosol particles. A semi-sealed environment is created inside the BADGER, which maintains at least twelve-air changes per hour using in-wall vacuum suction, and multiple hand-ports enable healthcare providers to perform essential tasks on a patient’s airway and head. Overall, the BADGER has the potential to contain large droplets and small airborne particles as demonstrated by simulated qualitative and quantitative assessments to provide an additional layer of protection for healthcare providers treating COVID-19 patients.

Read in full at medRxiv.

This is an abstract of a preprint hosted on a preprint server, which is currently undergoing peer review at Scientific Reports. The findings have yet to be thoroughly evaluated, nor has a decision on ultimate publication been made. Therefore, the results reported should not be considered conclusive, and these findings should not be used to inform clinical practice, or public health policy, or be promoted as verified information.



Scientific Reports

Nature Research, Springer Nature